How to cook Kasha- Ancient Grain

Ancient grain with alluring smell

Are you in need of an authentic grain recipe with the best gluten free product? If so, cheer up because I will let you in on an easy ancient grain recipe for kasha. In this article, you will learn what is Kasha, how to cook it, and also the age-old debate around it. Understandably, it can be overwhelming  to choose from rows of assorted grains, seeds, and nuts that look almost the same and not knowing if you will like it. As is the case with rice and grains, the unsettled kasha vs buckwheat tug of war can be all the more confusing. However, you can henceforth rest easy because I will enlighten you on how to cook this ancient grain for optimal usage. Raw or cooked, Kasha has an alluring sweet smell.

Video Recipe

Related: Plant-based Thiakry Burkina Degue Tips

In most ancient grain recipes, the terms are often used interchangeably to refer to either of them. However, the main distinction in the kasha vs buckwheat debate relates to the fact that the former is toasted while the latter is raw. Furthermore, kasha are reddish hue while buckwheat is light brown and greenish in color. For me, I often buy raw buckwheat from the store and toast them finely into kasha.
Uncooked Kasha- Ancient Grain

What is kasha?

In simple terms, kasha is another way to call roasted buckwheat groats. Commonly, kasha is the name most people use for the highly nutritious and wholesome porridge dish from groats. A porridge from roasted buckwheat groats undergoes soaking before being slowly simmered until soft. If you love your porridge slightly sour and fermented, you can try this unfailing buttery Motogo Wa Ting porridge. Interestingly, kasha has been utilized as an ancient grain recipe for at least a century. Sure, it seems our great grandmothers have long figured out how to cook kasha and reaped the benefits. The end product of this delightful ancient grain recipe gives you a flavorful grain, which has a sweet aroma and nutty taste. 

In simple terms, kasha is another way to call roasted buckwheat groats. Commonly, kasha is the name most people use for the highly nutritious and wholesome porridge dish from groats. A porridge from roasted buckwheat groats undergoes soaking before being slowly simmered until soft. If you love your porridge slightly sour and fermented, you can try this unfailing buttery Motogo Wa Ting porridge. Interestingly, kasha has been utilized as an ancient grain recipe for at least a century. Sure, it seems our great grandmothers have long figured out how to cook kasha and reaped the benefits. The end product of this delightful ancient grain recipe gives you a flavorful grain, which has a sweet aroma and nutty taste.
Kasha-Quinoa Combo Ancient Grains

You can make Kasha as a side dish or some people combine it with pasta. Key things to note are, it is nutty, quick to cook and has a rich flavor and sweet smell. Be inspired to learn how to cook this age old reliable grain, whose high magnesium content helps lower your blood sugar, says health experts. Try it at home today.

Related: Rice and Grains: The Good, Bad and Worst

Kasha vs buckwheat

There’s no dying down in the passionate debate of kasha vs buckwheat as to which is the best gluten free product. In most ancient grain recipes, the terms are often used interchangeably to refer to either of them. However, the main distinction in the kasha vs buckwheat debate relates to the fact that the former is toasted while the latter is raw. Furthermore, kasha are a reddish-brown hue while buckwheat is light brown and greenish in color. For me, I often buy raw buckwheat from the store and toast them gently into kasha.

There’s no dying down in the passionate debate of kasha vs buckwheat as to which is the best gluten free product. In most ancient grain recipes, the terms are often used interchangeably to refer to either of them. However, the main distinction in the kasha vs buckwheat debate relates to the fact that the former is toasted while the latter is raw. Furthermore, kasha are a reddish-brown hue while buckwheat is light brown and greenish in color. For me, I often buy raw buckwheat from the store and toast them gently into kasha.
Kasha compared to Buckwheat

For starters, do not be misled by the name “buck-wheat” itself to assume it is a grain of the wheat family. In fact, buckwheat is related to amaranth or quinoa, belonging to the pseudocereal group of food. That’s just a fancy way of referring to seeds consumed in the same ways as cereal grains. However, you will not find them typically growing on grasses. Instead, these grains are in reality the seeds of a flowering plant of the rhubarb or sorrel family (image below). I mix Kasha with other grains to incorporate its alluring smell and it pairs well with quinoa or brown rice combo.

However, you will not find them typically growing on grasses. Instead, these grains are in reality the seeds of a flowering plant of the rhubarb or sorrel family (image below). I mix Kasha with other grains to incorporate its alluring smell and it pairs well with quinoa or brown rice combo.
A seeding buckwheat plant

How to cook kasha

Firstly, it is worth noting that buckwheat has been a mainstay in ancient grain recipes for over 8000 years. Given that buckwheat is technically a seed as opposed to a grain. Yep, the jury is out as to whether buckwheat rivals kasha as one of the best gluten free products. While buckwheat naturally comes gluten-free, it is crucial to always go for buckwheat flour labeled “gluten-free”. This is important because buckwheat often gets cross-contaminated with gluten during cultivation and processing

Related: Ancient Grains Stir Fry High Plant Protein

In very simple terms, kasha is another way to call roasted buckwheat groats. Commonly, kasha is the name most people use for the highly nutritious and wholesome porridge dish from groats. A porridge from roasted buckwheat groats undergoes soaking before being slowly simmered until soft.
Cooked Kasha

Aside from the kasha vs buckwheat argument, here is a pro tip for this ancient grain recipe on how to cook kasha. For starters, keep in mind kasha means toasted buckwheat, therefore it cooks in almost half the time it takes buckwheat groats to soften. In order to amplify the nutty flavor, begin by toasting the buckwheat groats in a dry pan prior to cooking. Toasted Kasha is more expensive than Buckwheat groats. On the upside, ancient grains deliver filling and savory results. A case in point is this ancient grains stir fry high protein recipe. For the full cooking recipe, refer to the video tutorial or use the written guide below. 

You can enjoy this ancient grain as porridge just like any other wholesome, nutritious breakfast or dinner pairings from the African continent.  

Finally…

Have you eaten this type of grain before? What was your reaction after you ate it? In the end, you will know if you hacked how to cook kasha following this ancient grain recipe. Your cooked kasha should not have a firm texture but also a slightly gummy consistency. On the other hand, a mushy cooked kasha means that you’ve overcooked it and can easily convert it to a porridge. There are many ways to enjoy this; one of the best gluten free products: as a dessert porridge, breakfast cereal, or just pudding. Let us know in the comments what is your favorite way to eat Kasha?

what-kasha-looks-like-cooked_humblevege

How to cook Kasha Ancient Grains

Yield: 3
Prep Time: 3 minutes
Cook Time: 10 minutes
Additional Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 18 minutes

No wonder hearing the name kasha, you might be urge to ask what is kasha?

The only difference is kasha is toasted or roasted buckwheat groats. Whereas, raw buckwheat groats are not toasted.

You might be missing out on tons of nutrients if you have never tried kasha. It is the best gluten free product rich with antioxidants and excellent for the immune system.

This low-carb and best gluten free product is a perfect nutritious dietary option for people having gluten sensitivities.

Before moving towards how to cook kasha, let me tell you a secret. A few tablespoons of water and a handful of kasha grains as per your estimate are all you would need.  

Ingredients

  • Kasha grains (as per your estimate)
  • Water

Instructions

    1. Rinse kasha grains thoroughly. You will notice some of the grains start to split open immediately after a wash. This is because these grains are quite delicate. (Tip: you can use a mesh strainer).
    2. Put the washed kasha grains into the rice cooker. Add only a little quantity of water (3 table spoon to start). Take an estimate of water as per the quantity of kasha grains you use. Add a little more water if you feel the need afterward. The tip is to go little by little. I have added less than 4
      tablespoons of water approximately here. You can also cook kasha grains on an open heat.
    3. Set the cooker on the brown rice setting.
    4. Since kasha is a very versatile food, you can prepare it as a porridge for breakfast. All you need to do is ferment the cooked kasha grains for at least 3 days and you’ll have a fermented porridge. For this, cover kasha grains completely in water and soak them for 3 days.
    5. Ensure all the seeds are fully cooked through. Let it cool.
    6. Enjoy the scrumptious bowl of kasha grains, the best gluten free product.

Notes

I hope this short recipe card has explained to you well ‘what is kasha?’, ‘kasha vs buckwheat’, and ‘how to cook kasha’.

Hope you try out this ancient grain recipe soon.

Do share the outcome with us!

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