Ivorian Attieke with Hijiki Seitan Recipe

There is nothing more refreshing than a plateful of Ivorian Attieke with a side of hijiki seitan (wheat gluten). Composed and balanced, the flavors blend together sweet, spicy, salty, oniony, and crunchy. You might be thinking how on earth could I make this dish at home; good news is, recreating this Vegetarian Attieke recipe and hijiki seitan is all about technique and assembling different elements onto your plate. 

Ivorian Attieke is one of those meals you would want to have on a cozy summer afternoon, and to top it up the hijiki seitan elevates the dish to another level. You could also try out this spicy wheat gluten seitan sandwich for another version of the seitan meal experience.

Ivorian Attieke is one of those meals you would want to have on a cozy summer afternoon, and to top it up the hijiki seitan elevates the dish to another level.
Hefty Authentic Ivorian Attieke

Video Recipe:

What is Attieke?

Attieke is a West African staple, native Ivorians pronounce it as Acheke. It is made from dried ground cassava which is then fermented to create a rich aroma and flavorful carbohydrate which compliments African dishes. Attieke originated from the deep coastal regions of  Ivory Coast. Present-day, some of us substitute fish for seaweed (Hijiki) to get the seafood flavor. 

Attieke is a West African staple, native Ivorians pronounce it as Acheke. It is made from dried ground cassava which is then fermented to create a rich aroma and flavorful carbohydrate which compliments African dishes. Attieke originated from the deep coastal regions of  Ivory Coast. Present-day, some of us substitute fish for seaweed (Hijiki) to get the seafood flavor. 
Radish and Fried Tofu Version

Native Ivorians favor Attieke because one can use many vegetables to add rich flavor to the Gari. To learn more about our nutritious hijiki seitan prepared from hijiki seaweeds, subscribe to stay tuned. Generally, African dishes are known for being spicy so this attieke recipe does not disappoint.  Tame the spiciness to your liking.

Benefits of Attieke and Hijiki seitan

This traditional African cuisine is loaded with nutritional benefits which any vegetarian would love. Although the spicy pepper sauce and onions are quite acidic, our dish is fairly balanced as the plantain adds a sweet element, and the fresh cucumber balances the acidity of the dish. Dieticians and health experts recommend we eat more raw vegetables and this Attieke recipe has many vegetable assortments of good nutritional value.  Overall, seitan is a good source of plant-protein, and  it is fairly light to compliment the gari.  

Although the spicy pepper sauce and onions are quite acidic, our dish is fairly balanced as the plantain adds a sweet element, and the fresh cucumber balances the acidity of the dish. Dieticians and health experts recommend we eat more raw vegetables and this Attieke recipe has many vegetable assortments of good nutritional value.  Overall, seitan is a good source of plant-protein, and  it is fairly light to compliment the gari.  
Plate of Attieke Without Pepper Sauce

Related: Seafood flavor Seitan Using Seaweed

Our recipe will help you recreate a festive version of this popular dish, which is combining the Attieki with seaweed seitan.  Now that you know how to make Attieke, we want to hear from you. Have you eaten this dish? If you did create it, what vegetables did you use?  Comment below.

Sharing is caring so share this with your circle of friends. 

Vegetarian Attieke Recipe

Vegetarian Attieke Recipe

Yield: 2.5
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 15 minutes
Additional Time: 10 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes

Attieke is all about assembling different delectable elements to create an explosion of flavors. You will get crunchy, savory spicy, some sweetness, oniony, and tons of protein. Talk about a well-balanced meal.

Ingredients

  • Attieke- Store bought (Gari)
  • Ripe Plantain
  • Avocado oil (Used Grape seed oil prior)
  • Yellow or Red Onion
  • Plant-Protein (hijiki Seitan)
  • Tomatoes (optional)
  • Cucumbers
  • Spicy Pepper Sauce (optional)

Instructions

    1. This recipe uses frozen Attieke (Gari). Let the frozen Attieke thaw out slowly which may take about a day depending on the size. After it is thawed, put your desired portion for eating a microwavable bowl and heat the Gari for 2 minutes to warm it up. One can also heat Gari on the stovetop.
    2. Peel a ripe Plantain and it into small sizes. Put your frying pan on medium heat, add 2 ½ tablespoons of Avocado oil (now I know grapeseed oil is not the best option). Fry the ripe plantain till it turns to a beautiful golden-brown color. Take out the fried ripe plantain from the pan and place it in a bowl.
    3. If you are using Tofu or Seitan, at this stage you want to fry it till golden brown with the left-over oil.
    4. Next, Cut the cucumber and tomato into even slices. slice your vegetables, cucumbers, tomatoes and onion. Note, Add the onion to a bowl of cold water to tame the acidity of the onion and make it crunchier. You don’t want to chew soggy fresh onions. 
    5. Got your paper sauce? If you don't have one premade, simply season your Gari with regular salt and black pepper or use red-pepper flakes.
    6. Lastly, assemble your dish. All the elements should blend in beautifully, with the Attieke at the bottom and fried plantain, and hijiki seitan (or plant protein) on top. Add tomatoes, onion slices, and cucumber. Enjoy!

Notes

Stay tuned for the pepper sauce recipe.

Did you make this recipe?

Please leave a comment on the blog or share a photo on Instagram

Suggested Recipes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Skip to Recipe